Living Everyday A Higher Life

Live Like You Mean It

#12 Don’t Miss It

‘Opportunity is missed by most people, because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.’

Thomas Edison

 

I saw this quote the other day when I was reading a certain book and I agreed so much with it that I decided to share it here.

I have realized that in life, most opportunity that you’ll meet will not come in what I can call “a finished form” but there will be some work, effort or something that you’ll have to do to get something of value out of it. Is it a job opportunity? You’ll have to go through the necessary procedures to get it and even afterwards you’ll have responsibilities and duties to carry out. Is it a business opportunity? You’ll have to do market surveys, business plans and so many other plans in order to grasp that opportunity. Is it a school / scholarship opportunity? You’ll have to apply, do interviews, write essays and even when selected there starts the long journey of attending classes, presentations and exams.

Just think of any opportunity, there will always be work to be done, even when you meet a new person and there’s a friendship opportunity, there’ll be things to do so that the relationship grows into a friendship and maybe even more than that. Therefore, it is important that we realize that there so many opportunities around us and if we want to seize them, we must be willing to work for it.

The interesting thing is that: most people value more something for which they have worked  and tend to undervalue what is given to them freely.

I was reading a book the other by Rod Judkins titled: The Art Of Creative Thinking, and I found a story therein that can really help us understand how vital it is to seize every opportunity that comes our way. I quote:

“The Kellogg Company was transformed into a success by a counterintuitive decision by Will Keith Kellogg. In the late 1920s, Kellogg’s was one of the competitors in the packaged-cereal market. When the Depression struck, the other companies did the predictable thing: they reined in expenses and cut back on advertising. It was the accepted wisdom. In hard times, most firms invest less in research and development. They try to preserve what they have. That was rational. It made sense. Kellogg made an irrational decision: he doubled his advertising budget instead. The Great Depression was just getting started, but he reasoned that people still needed to eat, and the breakfast of choice for most Americans was “flakes and milk.” Kellogg’s accountants and financial advisers were pressuring him to make cuts, but Kellogg saw that he would never have such a huge competitive advantage again—and he was proven right, emerging as the market leader by the end of the Depression. Today, statistics show that companies that continue spending on advertising during recessions do significantly better than those that make big cuts. Despite the evidence, many firms continue to follow their emotions and cut advertising in hard times.”

When Kellogg saw an opportunity despite the fact that it was during a period of depression, he went for it. He wasn’t afraid of the hard work it would take, the risks that were present and against all odds he preserved and in the end it paid off.

Let’s ask ourselves these questions: How many opportunities have we missed because we thought the environment was not favorable? Or because there was just too much risk involved?  Because we were waiting for a more convenient time or it just didn’t feel like that was it?

Almost no opportunity will  come knocking on your door like pizza delivery, waiting for you to just dig in; and even in that instance, you have to use your own effort to eat the pizza. Meaning the pizza was delivered but it won’t eat itself or magically enter into your body without work being done in the form of using forks and plates to eat, chew and swallow. Don’t forget also that by eating it, you’re giving work to your body to digest it and extract what it needs to keep functioning. That’s a food opportunity that you seized in the form of a pizza.

Even the most normal and routine things in our everyday life require work. So don’t be lazy but get up and work. Work for the future you desire. In my experience, I have found that the most valuable things in life are found in rather uncomfortable places: gold, diamonds and precious stones are found underground, to get petrol, there has to be digging deep into the earth, sometimes even under oceans and so many other examples out there.

Your success depends on your own hard work, so let’s get up, get out and start working. I know it’s not going to easy and it will most likely be a bumpy ride but just believe in yourself, step out, open your eyes and decide to seize every opportunity that presents itself to you. If you’re wondering how to identify it; remember : It’s dressed in overalls and looks like work. Now that you know how to spot it, Don’t miss even a single one.

Here are a few quotes to help you on the way:

‘People become really remarkable when they start thinking that they can do things. When they believe in themselves, they have the first secret of success’

Norman Vincent Peale

‘You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.’

Wayne Gretzky

‘I am a great believer in luck and I find that the harder I work, the more luck I have’

Thomas Jefferson

‘You’ve got to get up every morning with determination if you’re going to go to bed with satisfaction’

George Horace Lorimer

‘If you have goals and determination, you have nothing. If you have goals and you take actions, you will have anything you want’

Thomas J. Vilord

‘Successful people in this world are those who get up and look for circumstances they want. If you can’t find them, then make them. ‘

George Bernard Shaw

 

God’s Speed!!!

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5 Ways To Embrace Change: Start New Healthier Habits

Take a moment and cross your arms. Now, cross them in the opposite direction. Which way was more awkward?

If you thought crossing them the second time required more thought, you’re right. In fact, when you crossed them the first time, the signal came from a very different place in your brain than it did the second time.

Habits are the choices we make deliberately that at some point become automatic. They make up over 45 percent of what we do every day. Your brain is lazy. It doesn’t know the difference between a good habit and a bad habit. It just takes everything you repeatedly think, say, or do and turns it into a habit so it doesn’t have to work so hard.

When you crossed your arms the first time, your limbic system (the place that stores your memories and your habits) drove your actions. The second time you crossed your arms, the message came from the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain responsible for higher level thinking and planning. Any new thought or behavior starts in the prefrontal cortex and eventually becomes habituated if we use it enough.

Most people resist change because it threatens their natural habit patterns. Whether it’s a new role, a new boss, a new car, a new diet or new routine, your brain has to work overtime to learn to adapt to the change. Unfortunately, it’s like the old saying goes, “If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.”

Navigating change, both personally and professionally, requires you to form new habits, and that requires some discomfort. The more ingrained you are in the old way of doing things, the longer it takes to form new habits. The good news is you can intentionally train yourself to think and behave in new ways. The more you do it, the easier it becomes to form new habits.

The next time you are trying to navigate change, keep these thoughts in mind.

  1. You can’t counter emotion with logic.

When we go through change, we often feel anxiety and fear of the unknown. Others may tell us that the change logically makes sense. Unfortunately, that does little to alleviate the discomfort associated with it. Give yourself time to process whatever emotions you are feeling. Get curious as to why you feel anxious or afraid. Don’t judge your feelings, just observe them. This is the first step to embracing change.

  1. Identify what’s in it for you.

Even when we know a change is for our own good, it’s easy to resist it, preferring our comfortable old habits. Take time to identify your W.I.I.F.M. (What’s In It For Me). This is your motivator and will keep you going through the discomfort. If you can’t identify a positive benefit, ask what loss or negative outcome you are trying to avoid.

  1. Identify barriers and proactively manage them.

Let’s say your goal is to get healthier. This might mean exercising more, eating better or getting enough sleep. Even though we know these are good for us, the barriers of time, money, laziness or life get in the way. Trying to eat better? Plan your meals so that you have healthy food options wherever you are. Too tired to go to the gym after work? Sleep in your gym clothes and wake up 30 minutes early to go for a walk. Too tired? Don’t worry; exercise will help you get better sleep.

  1. Surround yourself with the right people.

We all have energy drainers in our lives. These people are full of drama and stress. They are toxic and will make change extremely difficult. Identify the people in your life who drain your energy and distance yourself from them. Conversely, identify those who make you feel supported and spend more time with them.

  1. Keep the big picture in mind.

When we are approaching a change, it can seem daunting. When we’ve made it through to the other side, it’s easy to look back with perspective and call it growth. Keep this in mind as you encounter adversity, challenge, and change in your life. So far, you’ve navigated every change thrown your way. That’s a pretty good track record.

Remember, if you want to behave differently, you have to think differently. We can retrain our brains and form new habits. It just takes courage and the willingness to step outside our comfort zones. Change can be scary, but by taking some time to proactively manage the process, you can set yourself up for success.

There are also questions you can ask yourself to find out your character and habits. It’s like checking yourself up at the doctor’s office.  Believe that you can and you will surprise yourself.

Don’t fight change, Embrace it but only if it’s good for yourself.

Check out a book called  “52 strategies for life love and work” by ANNE GRADY.

The Best Is Always Yet To Come